All posts by Paul Melcher

Paul Melcher is the founder of Kaptur. He is an entrepreneur, advisor, and consultant with a rich background in visual tech, content licensing, business strategy, and technology with more than 20 years experience in developing world-renowned photo based companies with already two successful exits.
The anti flickr

Funding the anti- Flickr

Imgur newly announced massive round of funding ( $40 Million by Andreessen Horowitz) is a captivating shot at the bow of the photo tech world, and here’s why: Practically unknown outside the geek and nerd world, Imgur is not your traditional photo sharing platform because it has nothing to do with photography. Users do not go on Imgur to look at pretty images, or to review last night party or even post photos of their latest vacation. Rather, it is a photo hosting site for…

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Mobile first

Mobile first, Mobile only

Let’s face it. The next successful photo tech company will be mobile first and mobile only. The key mistake most photo tech companies are currently making is trying to monetize on the laptop web. Besides traditional media, this is no longer the place where people  consume images. They want to take, alter, share and view images on their mobile devices. Twitter knows this and it’s recent new feature release is proof. One can now put 4 images in a tweet, viewable immediately in a feed, as…

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Grand Canyon_South Rim Marketplace_2714

The Marketplace Lure

Social media photo platforms, rising in numbers from the dual pull of Instagram $1 billion acquisition  and people’s insatiable appetite for  mobile photography, are facing a complicated maturity issue:  How to monetize without defection ? The first step of all social media photo platform is to gain traction by gaining market share. Here, all the models are the same : using the network effect, grow your users base to a comfortable number ( usually in the millions active users) by offering them a set of…

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Flickr buddies rememe 2.0

Getty / Flickr calls it quits

Busy week for Stock photography behemoth Getty Images. After opening up half of its images to free embedding, making a partnership with EyeEm, they have now announce that they are terminating their deal with Flickr. What does this mean ? On an individual level, photographers from Flickr who have images on Getty will continue to be represented by Getty according to their agreement. However, Getty will not continue to mine Flickr for new photos or photographers.  Instead, they recommend Flickr users to pick up the…

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Freedom

35 millions images for free

        It was just a question of time. We have repeatedly wrote here about how the current photo licensing model is broken and obsolete. We also explained at full length how image data collection and third-party revenue are the new gold mine. Getty apparently heard and is now applying. (If you want to read how it works, there is a great full explanation here) Getty Images announcement today that it has put 35 Million of its 80 million images up for free is…

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ellen degeneres oscar selfie

The selfie heard all around the world

The most seen picture of last night’s Oscars was not neither taken by a Dslr, nor a professional photographer and was not published (at first) in any publication. It was a selfie taken on a Samsung Note 3 by an actor and published on Twitter. If any one needed a confirmation of where photography is heading, last night was a prime example. Relegated to taking full length fashion shots behind barricades, or shooting the stage from a balcony, pro photographers were by far outclassed by…

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Vessel underway, possibly the training ship MERSEY

The content or the vessel

Photo app EyeEm announcement today that it will be opening an image licensing database made of photos submitted by its users brings an interesting though to the photo tech space. Considered by many as the gentle Instagram’s – its ToS does not attempt a copyright grab- it has managed to carve itself a respectable area in the very crowded space of the phone app with a sharing network. Being a free app, it is now trying to find a revenue model that preserves its photographer/contributor…

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space

Making money out of Social Media photography

How brands use photography on social media should be an indication on how to monetize photography on social media. By now, most of them are fully aware that having a presence on social media is an absolute must. Minimum, the big three, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Since the buzz recently has been strong about Pinterest bringing in the most traffic conversion, although not entirely correct, it has also joined the mix.  According to the CMO survey by Duke University companies currently spend 7.4% of their…

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IMG_3017

Shutterstock Financial results : An Analysis

Listening in to Shutterstock’s financial results feels a little bit like being thrown back in time when Getty Images was a publicly traded company, with the numbers being obviously different.  First the main numbers. Shutterstock has reported full year revenue of $235.5 million for 2013, up an impressive 39% (1). While other companies in the same space are seemingly seeing single digit growth, if not retreats, it is quite a striking feast. However, overall, compared to Getty Images reported $897 million projected revenue for 2013, with…

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Queens, New York CityJuly 31, 2011

Sell your photos apps : Why it’s a bad idea

This week, on the same day actually, two companies released a new mobile photography marketplace app. Both with same underlying concept : With this app, anyone can shoot and submit their pictures to be licensed to image buyers worldwide. In a world where everyone  snaps an images every 3.5 hour of their waking life, why not built a marketplace where people can submit some of these images so that others can license them. Great idea, no ? No. For many reasons : They are building…

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